Looking Forward to Holy Week 2019

Holy Week Schedule

We are looking forward to our annual observance of Holy Week here at MLLC in Carmine.  This is a powerful event which connects us to the core message and story of Jesus Christ.

We invite you to participate in these meaningful and reflective services.  Each is quite unique from what we do on other days of the year.  The actions and words in worship guide us through the various events of this final week of Jesus’ ministry.

In recent years some people have gotten out of the good habit of participating in the various Holy Week services.  This year can be a blessed opportunity for any and all to recommit to engaging in the story of Jesus through the Holy Week services.

We will share our services with our partner church, Waldeck Evangelical Lutheran Church in Ledbetter.  Information about when and where we will be gathered for worship is noted in the schedule.  Here is the link to the Holy Week 2019 schedule:  click link.

Holy Week Schedule 2018

Holy Week Schedule

Holy Week – Celebrating the Saving Work of Jesus Christ

We invite you to be part of our celebrations and observances as we remember all the great things Jesus has done for us.  Every year around this time we gather to ponder anew the suffering, death and resurrection of Jesus.  We get to revisit the central parts of our life and faith with him.

Everything else in our life and faith makes sense and matters because of the things we ponder this week.  Each service has a focus on the various actions and events in this final week of Jesus’ ministry on earth.

Palm Sunday reenacts Jesus’ Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem.

Maundy Thursday revisits the major actions of Jesus at the Last supper with his Disciples.  These include the washing of the Disciples’ Feet, the Command to Love, the Institution of the Holy Communion, and the Arrest of Jesus.

Good Friday invites us to gather at the Cross of Christ.  On the Cross he suffers and dies for the forgiveness of our sin.

On Holy Saturday we gather for the Great Vigil of Easter.  In this time we gather with the followers of Jesus to wait for the fulfillment of his promise to Rise from the dead.  In this service we light a new fire in hope of the Resurrection.  We tell the stories of faith from the Old Testament.  We celebrate the gift of Baptism which is our holy connection to the death and resurrection of Jesus.  In the end we renew our commitment to follow Jesus as we celebrate the Lord’s Supper at the beginning of our Resurrection Celebration.

Early on Sunday we gather in the Carmine Cemetery for our Easter Sunrise Service.  This is an ancient tradition of Christians.  Our brothers and sisters in the faith have gathered in cemeteries early on Easter Sunday since the earliest days of the Church.  We do this to reconnect with the place of Jesus’ Resurrection.  He was raised from the dead in a graveyard of sorts, the borrowed tomb in which Jesus’ body was placed.  It was early in the morning on the first day of the week, as we read in John chapter 20.

Later that morning we celebrate with the whole Church that Jesus Christ has been raised from the dead.

Here is the schedule of our Holy Week Services.  We will also include the schedule of services at our partner church, Waldeck Evangelical Lutheran Church near Ledbetter.

All are welcome at these services at either church.

Palm Sunday Weekend

Saturday, March 24 – 6:00 p.m. at Carmine

Sunday, March 25 – 8:00 a.m. at Waldeck; 10:00 a.m. at Carmine.  Both Sunday services will include the procession of Palms.  Waldeck will also include the Passion story from Mark’s Gospel.

 

Maundy Thursday

Thursday, March 29 – 5:45 p.m. at Waldeck; 7:30 p.m. at Carmine

 

Good Friday

Friday, March 30 – 7:00 p.m. at Carmine

 

Holy Saturday

– The Great Vigil of Easter

Saturday, March 31 – 7:00 p.m. at Carmine

 

Easter Sunday – The Resurrection of our Lord

Sunrise Service – 6:45 a.m. at the Carmine Cemetery – bring a lawn chair for seating.  We will gather among the graves.  If inclement weather we will gather in the pavilion at the cemetery.

At Waldeck:  8:00 a.m. Festival Service – outside in the pavilion on the south end of the church building.  If inclement weather, inside the church.  Holy Communion.

The service will be followed by a pot-luck brunch in Annex.  An Egg Hunt will be offered around 9:30 a.m.

 

At Carmine:  9:00 a.m. – Sunday School in Fellowship Hall.  Also, a reception with kolaches, coffee, etc. will be offered in the Parlor (the room next to the sanctuary.)

10:00 a.m. Easter Festival Service with Holy Communion.

11:15 a.m. Easter Egg Hunt, outside the Sanctuary entrance.

After Easter:

After Easter Sunday, both churches will resume their regular weekend schedule:

Carmine:  Sunday School at 9:00 a.m.; Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m.

Worship on the 2nd and 4th Saturdays at 6:00 p.m.

 

Waldeck:  Sunday Worship at 8:00 a.m.; Sunday school at 9:15 a.m.

First Holy Communion Class 2017

1st Holy Communion Group 2016

First Holy Communion Class begins this month

By Pastor David Tinker

pastordjt@industryinet.com     979-278-3388

 

The First Holy Communion Class will be held over three Sundays in late March and early April.  Each class will be held in the Mission & Ministry Building (New Building behind Parsonage).  See the photo above which shows the 2016 class group with the bread they baked for their First Communion.

Class Dates:  March 26, April 2 and 9 – after worship – starting about 11:00 a.m.

 

First Holy Communion at MLLC is most often offered to students in 5th grade.  There are numerous cases in which there are exceptions to this.  If you and your student, who is not yet in 5th grade, wish to participate in this class please speak with me to make arrangements.  The 5th grade tradition does not prevent younger students from attending the class and receiving Holy Communion.

Students are encouraged to bring a Bible for use in class, as well as paper/pen for any notes they might want to write.  If students don’t have access to a Bible we have one for their use.  Note that each student will be presented with a Bible on First Communion Thursday – April 13 – for his or her personal study and for use in Sunday School, Confirmation and Worship.  Parents/Grandparents are welcome and encouraged to be present at this class time.  We will meet at a table in the Mission and Ministry Building, but will also move to other places in the church facilities for parts of the lessons.

The class will include instruction, discussion, videos, mini-field trips in the building, etc.

We are working to avoid Spring Break weekends for this class, therefore all sessions are after Spring Break.  Please consult with me if you have special needs about family schedules, vacations, parental custody issues, etc.  which could conflict with the posted schedule. I want this opportunity to work for your student.

Notes that one of the Sunday classes will include bread baking by the students.  This bread will be used at their First Communion service.

We will Celebrate our First Holy Communion on:

Thursday, April 13        7:30 p.m.

Maundy Thursday Service, First Holy Communion Day

Presentation of Bible to students during worship – the Church gives to Parent/Grandparent, and then the parent/grandparent presents Bible to student. We will go over this before Thursday so all are ready.

 

Students please arrive by 7:00 p.m. to make sure all our plans are in order for what we will be doing at worship.  Also, families may wish to take photos before worship, and this is the best time to do this.  The altar area will be bare of all decorations, candles, banners, etc. after worship due to the “Stripping of the Altar”.

 

I look forward to exploring this wonderful sacrament with your child.  This is a very exciting time of growth for these young people and for their families.  If you have any questions or needs please feel free to contact me.  Please see the article below about discerning your child’s interest and readiness to receive the sacrament.

 

 

 

How do I know my child is ready to attend First Communion Class?

He or She may. . .

*have expressed interest in participating in Holy Communion during worship, perhaps copying your movements at the altar

*have begun to ask questions about why we take Holy Communion

*have begun to reach for the Holy Communion elements which are offered to you

*have a foundation in Christ through attendance in Christian education or worship, or through family conversations, devotions or prayer

*be able to speak about God (Father, Son and Holy Spirit) as loving and trustworthy

*pray the Lord’s Prayer and be able to say other simple prayers (such as at bedtime and meals)

 

The following questions can help you determine the readiness of your child to receive her or his first Holy Communion.

 

The most important question is about God’s gift of Grace for your child:

***** Has your child been baptized?

If your child is not yet baptized, please speak with a pastor to set a date for your child to receive this Sacrament. It is understood that Holy Communion is for the baptized children of God.

 

Other questions to consider:

*Is your child comfortable in various locations around the church, like the altar?

*Does your child have a basic, age-appropriate awareness that God loves him or her?

*Does your child understand the idea of “right” and “wrong”, and can grasp the basic notion of “forgiveness”?

*Will your child extend his or her hands when asked to do so?

*Will your child be able to understand the basic concept that Holy Communion is a gift from God to each person?

*Does your child seem to have a basic trust that they are a child of God?

*Does your child seem interested in what goes on in church during Communion?

*Does your child interact enough with others to receive the bread and wine?

*Is your child aware enough of others in the congregation and their needs to show respect for the communion experience?

*Are you prepared to help make the process positive?

*Are you prepared to continue to fulfill the promises you made at your child’s baptism to bring him or her regularly to the Lord’s Table?

 

 

Only the first question (Has your child been baptized?) requires a “Yes” before your child can be considered ready to receive his or her first communion. Use the others to generate discussion and to plan, in consultation with Pastor David Tinker, for your child’s preparation to begin receiving the sacrament and the gifts it brings.

Contact Pastor David Tinker if you have any questions about Holy Communion. He would be happy to help answer your questions.

Maundy Thursday – March 24

 

CommunionBreadWine

Maundy Thursday is March 24

We will gather for the observance of Maundy Thursday on March 24, at 7 p.m.  You are invited to this first of the Three Holy Days of Holy Week.

An Introduction to Maundy Thursday

The Maundy Thursday service is one of endings and beginnings. What was begun on Ash Wednesday is brought to a close here today. What begins today does not end until the Day of Resurrection. It is the ancient Triduum, “The Three Sacred Days,” which lead us to the celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord: Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday.
The theme is love, our Savior’s love for us, expressed in the washing of the disciples’ feet, in giving himself in bread and wine, in dying upon the cross. An invitation to confession is given. The focus is on forgiveness. On Ash Wednesday, we began Lent with a major act of confession and ashes, but we did not receive a strong statement of forgiveness in the absolution. That bold announcement of forgiveness comes now, “In the mercy of almighty God,” and “in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit,” at the service celebrating Christ’s love.
The lessons of love are read. A new command derives from it: “Love one another.” The name “Maundy” comes from the first word of the Latin form of John 13:34: ” mandatum novum do vobis ut diligatis invicem sicut dilexi vos ut et vos diligatis invicem” (“I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another.”). This self-giving love is demonstrated in the washing of feet.  The prayers are said. The table is made ready. The time of the Lord’s Supper arrives, and our Lord is revealed in bread and wine as once he “revealed himself to his disciples.” It is a solemn moment, but we cannot linger here.  Nor could the Lord, for His betrayal was imminent.
Before we know it, the markings of betrayal are seen before us. The symbol of Christ in our midst, the altar, is stripped bare. Christ is stripped of his power and glory. Good Friday is inescapable. The powers of darkness work upon him.
In silence, we depart without benediction. The Three Sacred Days continue with the Good Friday service tomorrow at 7:00 p.m.  We will also gather on Saturday evening at 7 p.m. for the Vigil of Easter.

 

First Holy Communion

At this special service there will be 7 young people who will be receiving their First Holy Communion.  In preparation for this day they made the bread for use at the service on Maundy Thursday.

1st Holy Communion Group 2016

 

Preparing for Maundy Thursday

CommunionBreadWineThursday, April 2 is our Maundy Thursday service.  We invite you to gather with the people of God at MLLC at 7:00 p.m.

We believe it is an important and faith enriching experience to be part of these special days.  Worship will be each night at 7:00 p.m.  These Three Days together are called the Great Triduum.

*Maundy Thursday – April 2 – We connect with the events of the Last Supper of Jesus with his Apostles.  We also remember his betrayal and arrest.

*Good Friday – April 3 – We connect with the suffering, death and entombment of Jesus Christ.

*The Great Vigil of Easter – April 4 – We remember the waiting of the followers of Jesus when he was in the tomb and before he was raised from the dead.  We celebrate the victory of the Resurrection from the dead of Jesus.

Here is the introduction we use for Maundy Thursday:

The Maundy Thursday service is one of endings and beginnings. What was begun on Ash Wednesday is brought to a close here today. What begins today does not end until the Day of Resurrection. It is the ancient Triduum, “The Three Sacred Days,” which lead us to the celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord: Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday.
The theme is love, our Savior’s love for us, expressed in the washing of the disciples’ feet, in giving himself in bread and wine, in dying upon the cross. An invitation to confession is given. The focus is on forgiveness. On Ash Wednesday, we began Lent with a major act of confession and ashes, but we did not receive a strong statement of forgiveness in the absolution. That bold announcement of forgiveness comes now, “In the mercy of almighty God,” and “in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit,” at the service celebrating Christ’s love.
The lessons of love are read. A new command derives from it: “Love one another.” The name “Maundy” comes from the first word of the Latin form of John 13:34: “Mandatum novum do vobis ut diligatis invicem sicut dilexi vos” (“I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another.”). This self-giving love is demonstrated in the washing of feet. The prayers are said. The table is made ready. The time of the Lord’s Supper arrives, and our Lord is revealed in bread and wine as once he “revealed himself to his disciples.” It is a solemn moment, but we cannot linger here. Nor could the Lord, for His betrayal was imminent.
Before we know it, the markings of betrayal are seen before us. The symbol of Christ in our midst, the altar, is stripped bare. Christ is stripped of his power and glory. Good Friday is inescapable. The powers of darkness work upon him.
In silence, we depart without benediction. The Three Sacred Days continue with the Good Friday service on April 3 at 7:00 p.m. We will also gather on Saturday evening, April 4 at 7 p.m. for the Vigil of Easter.

Palm Sunday 2015

 

 

IMG_4580

Palm Sunday 2015 is this weekend.  We will have worship on both Saturday night at 6 p.m. and Sunday morning at 9:00 a.m.  Plan your weekend around making sure you are at worship this week for the beginning of Holy Week.

At both services we will do the following things:

*Remember the Triumphal Entry of Jesus into Jerusalem.  We will wave palm branches as they did nearly 2000 years ago.  We will give thanks to God for the fulfillment of his prophecy about the coming Messiah and eternal King of Israel.

*We will begin our Holy Week observance.  Click here for the full schedule.

*We will dedicate the Lutheran World Relief quilts and kits.  See the photo above for an image of what we did last year at this time.

 

You are invited to make this the beginning of a very special week as we relive and experience the joys and sorrows of this most important week in human history.

 

Holy Week is Coming Soon

Holy-Week-Worship-Art

The centerpiece of the church year is the season of Lent and the events of Holy Week.  We invite you to be part of our revisiting of these core events in the life and ministry of Jesus Christ our Lord.

Click over to our Lent & Holy Week Schedule to find out more.  It is all listed on our recently updated main church page:  Here is the Link.

Introduction to Good Friday

jesus-christ-crucifixion-395

As part of our Good Friday service bulletin we include this introduction to the service.

We gather to worship the Crucified Savior tonight at 7 p.m., Friday, April 18, 2014.

 

An Introduction to Good Friday – Tenebrae

We begin our liturgy as we ended the Maundy Thursday Liturgy: in silence. What was begun then continues this day as we journey with our Savior from the Last Supper, the stripping and humiliation, to the cross and tomb. Good Friday is the second day of the Triduum, the “Three Sacred Days” of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday with its Vigil of Easter.

 

The Good Friday Liturgy is marked with austerity, silence and reflection. The chancel itself is bare from the Maundy Thursday stripping. There is no organ music except to accompany the hymns and sung musical pieces. Everything focuses on our adoration of the crucified Christ, reigning from the throne of the cross.

 

The service of Tenebrae is an ancient Holy Week devotion which began in the 7th or 8th century, or possibly earlier. The name “Tenebrae” means shadows. The service takes its name from the ceremony of extinguishing in succession all the lights in the sanctuary, casting it into total darkness which is symbolic of the disciples’ desertion of our Lord, and of his death and burial.

 

The purpose of the Tenebrae Service is to aid us in realizing the total impact of the darkest day in the history of the world, the day Jesus died on the cross.

 

The opening portion of the liturgy includes no praise. It proceeds directly to the Prayer of the Day. It is a simplified version of our Sunday Liturgy of the Word. The chief acts are the reading of the Passion of St. John and the Bidding Prayer for the needs of our world. After each section of the Passion of St. John is read, there will be a time of silent meditation. Lights will begin to be extinguished or dimmed more after each reading and meditation until the sanctuary is in darkness.

 

A large cross, which vividly and dramatically portrays the events of this day, is then brought into the church in solemn procession to become the focus of our adoration of the crucified Christ. Placed upon at the front of the chancel, the crucifix is central to our meditations in word and in silence. The words of meditation are the ancient Reproaches. The words of reproach are those of God directed to us, his people, who have crucified the Savior of the world by our sin. The Reproaches expand upon the words of the prophet Micah (6:3-5) and burn in our hearts. The liturgy does not end on this note of reproach, however. The closing versicles and prayer emphasize the triumph and redemption that comes through the cross.

 

After the lights are all extinguished, the congregation will stand as the Paschal Candle is carried from the sanctuary reminding us of the burial of Jesus. A loud noise, made by the closing of a Bible, will remind us of the closing of the tomb as well as the fulfilling of the Scriptures and the completion of our Lord’s work on the cross for us.

 

The Paschal Candle (called the Christ Candle during Advent/Christmas) will not return until the beginning of the Great Vigil of Easter on Saturday evening at 7 p.m. On Good Friday we recognize that Jesus was fully dead and was placed in the borrowed tomb.

 

Note: The return of the Paschal Candle moments after the loud noise is a form of the Good Friday service designed to be used in those congregations which do not have the Great Vigil of Easter.

 

All will leave in silence to return tomorrow as we wait in vigil and then celebrate our Lord’s resurrection at the Great Vigil of Easter. At the Vigil tomorrow evening we will have the first Holy Communion in celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.

After the Triduum we will continue our celebration on Sunday morning with the Sunrise service at 7:30 at the Carmine Cemetery, breakfast in the fellowship hall at 8 a.m. and the Festival Service at 9:00 a.m. Around 10:15-10:30 a.m. we will have the Resurrection Egg hunt and party for the children.

Click here to see the first post in this series about Maundy Thursday.

 

Thanks to Pr. Thomas L. Weitzel, ELCA.  This introduction was adapted from his original work.

Introduction to Maundy Thursday

Image

We gather this evening at 7 p.m. for Worship on this Maundy Thursday.

Here is the introduction to this Sacred Day which we use at Martin Luther Lutheran Church in Carmine.

An Introduction to Maundy Thursday
The Maundy Thursday service is one of endings and beginnings. What was begun on Ash Wednesday is brought to a close here today. What begins today does not end until the Day of Resurrection. It is the ancient Triduum, “The Three Sacred Days,” which lead us to the celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord: Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday.
The theme is love, our Savior’s love for us, expressed in the washing of the disciples’ feet, in giving himself in bread and wine, in dying upon the cross. An invitation to confession is given. The focus is on forgiveness. On Ash Wednesday, we began Lent with a major act of confession and ashes, but we did not receive a strong statement of forgiveness in the absolution. That bold announcement of forgiveness comes now, “In the mercy of almighty God,” and “in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit,” at the service celebrating Christ’s love.
The lessons of love are read. A new command derives from it: “Love one another.” The name “Maundy” comes from the first word of the Latin form of John 13:34: “Mandatum novum do vobis ut diligatis invicem sicut dilexi vos” (“I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another.”). This self-giving love is demonstrated in the washing of feet. The prayers are said. The table is made ready. The time of the Lord’s Supper arrives, and our Lord is revealed in bread and wine as once he “revealed himself to his disciples.” It is a solemn moment, but we cannot linger here. Nor could the Lord, for His betrayal was imminent.
Before we know it, the markings of betrayal are seen before us. The symbol of Christ in our midst, the altar, is stripped bare. Christ is stripped of his power and glory. Good Friday is inescapable. The powers of darkness work upon him.
In silence, we depart without benediction. The Three Sacred Days continue with the Good Friday service tomorrow at 7:00 p.m. We will also gather on Saturday evening at 7 p.m. for the Vigil of Easter.

 

Thanks to Pr. Thomas L. Weitzel, ELCA.  This introduction is adapted from his original work.

 

First Communion is on Maundy Thursday at MLLC

First Holy Communion Prep 1

As part of our Holy Week observance we celebrate the First Holy Communion for our youth.  This year we have one youth who will begin participating in this wonderful Sacrament of the Church.  He has participated in First Holy Communion classes during Lent this year.  This included Bible Study, discussions, a “field trip” to the Sacristy (the room where the communion is prepared, and the communion vessels are stored), decorating a chalice for receiving his First Communion, videos and bread making.

The Junior High Sunday School class helped the student with the bread making.  Much of the bread used for Holy Communion at MLLC is made by our youth, as well as other church members.  Above is a photo of the students and their teacher preparing the bread on Palm Sunday 2014.  This recipe makes a flat bread, and it is cooked almost like a pancake.  Thank you Esther for teaching our youth how to make this bread for this special day.  Very tasty and important ministry.

 

Here are the youth and the First Holy Communion student after they have sampled the finished product.  Our candidate for First Holy Communion is in the red/white plaid shirt, 2nd from the right.

First Holy Communion Prep 2

As part of worship on this Maundy Thursday the student will also receive a Bible from the congregation.  This he will use for personal reading, Sunday School, Confirmation Class, and the like.  We partner with parents in helping them to fulfill the vows they made at their children’s baptism.  There is a line in the liturgy of Holy Baptism which reads, “place in their hands the holy scriptures…” At the Maundy Thursday service a Bible will be given to the parent, and then that Bible will be placed in the hands of the student.  It is a loving ritual form of fulfilling this promise.  Here is a photo of the Bible, next to the Baptismal Font, and  with our Holy Communion banner in the background.

First Holy Communion Bible 14

 

Click here to read more about First Holy Communion at MLLC.

Click here to see our Holy Week Schedule for 2014.