Looking Forward to Holy Week 2019

Holy Week Schedule

We are looking forward to our annual observance of Holy Week here at MLLC in Carmine.  This is a powerful event which connects us to the core message and story of Jesus Christ.

We invite you to participate in these meaningful and reflective services.  Each is quite unique from what we do on other days of the year.  The actions and words in worship guide us through the various events of this final week of Jesus’ ministry.

In recent years some people have gotten out of the good habit of participating in the various Holy Week services.  This year can be a blessed opportunity for any and all to recommit to engaging in the story of Jesus through the Holy Week services.

We will share our services with our partner church, Waldeck Evangelical Lutheran Church in Ledbetter.  Information about when and where we will be gathered for worship is noted in the schedule.  Here is the link to the Holy Week 2019 schedule:  click link.

Holy Week Schedule 2018

Holy Week Schedule

Holy Week – Celebrating the Saving Work of Jesus Christ

We invite you to be part of our celebrations and observances as we remember all the great things Jesus has done for us.  Every year around this time we gather to ponder anew the suffering, death and resurrection of Jesus.  We get to revisit the central parts of our life and faith with him.

Everything else in our life and faith makes sense and matters because of the things we ponder this week.  Each service has a focus on the various actions and events in this final week of Jesus’ ministry on earth.

Palm Sunday reenacts Jesus’ Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem.

Maundy Thursday revisits the major actions of Jesus at the Last supper with his Disciples.  These include the washing of the Disciples’ Feet, the Command to Love, the Institution of the Holy Communion, and the Arrest of Jesus.

Good Friday invites us to gather at the Cross of Christ.  On the Cross he suffers and dies for the forgiveness of our sin.

On Holy Saturday we gather for the Great Vigil of Easter.  In this time we gather with the followers of Jesus to wait for the fulfillment of his promise to Rise from the dead.  In this service we light a new fire in hope of the Resurrection.  We tell the stories of faith from the Old Testament.  We celebrate the gift of Baptism which is our holy connection to the death and resurrection of Jesus.  In the end we renew our commitment to follow Jesus as we celebrate the Lord’s Supper at the beginning of our Resurrection Celebration.

Early on Sunday we gather in the Carmine Cemetery for our Easter Sunrise Service.  This is an ancient tradition of Christians.  Our brothers and sisters in the faith have gathered in cemeteries early on Easter Sunday since the earliest days of the Church.  We do this to reconnect with the place of Jesus’ Resurrection.  He was raised from the dead in a graveyard of sorts, the borrowed tomb in which Jesus’ body was placed.  It was early in the morning on the first day of the week, as we read in John chapter 20.

Later that morning we celebrate with the whole Church that Jesus Christ has been raised from the dead.

Here is the schedule of our Holy Week Services.  We will also include the schedule of services at our partner church, Waldeck Evangelical Lutheran Church near Ledbetter.

All are welcome at these services at either church.

Palm Sunday Weekend

Saturday, March 24 – 6:00 p.m. at Carmine

Sunday, March 25 – 8:00 a.m. at Waldeck; 10:00 a.m. at Carmine.  Both Sunday services will include the procession of Palms.  Waldeck will also include the Passion story from Mark’s Gospel.

 

Maundy Thursday

Thursday, March 29 – 5:45 p.m. at Waldeck; 7:30 p.m. at Carmine

 

Good Friday

Friday, March 30 – 7:00 p.m. at Carmine

 

Holy Saturday

– The Great Vigil of Easter

Saturday, March 31 – 7:00 p.m. at Carmine

 

Easter Sunday – The Resurrection of our Lord

Sunrise Service – 6:45 a.m. at the Carmine Cemetery – bring a lawn chair for seating.  We will gather among the graves.  If inclement weather we will gather in the pavilion at the cemetery.

At Waldeck:  8:00 a.m. Festival Service – outside in the pavilion on the south end of the church building.  If inclement weather, inside the church.  Holy Communion.

The service will be followed by a pot-luck brunch in Annex.  An Egg Hunt will be offered around 9:30 a.m.

 

At Carmine:  9:00 a.m. – Sunday School in Fellowship Hall.  Also, a reception with kolaches, coffee, etc. will be offered in the Parlor (the room next to the sanctuary.)

10:00 a.m. Easter Festival Service with Holy Communion.

11:15 a.m. Easter Egg Hunt, outside the Sanctuary entrance.

After Easter:

After Easter Sunday, both churches will resume their regular weekend schedule:

Carmine:  Sunday School at 9:00 a.m.; Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m.

Worship on the 2nd and 4th Saturdays at 6:00 p.m.

 

Waldeck:  Sunday Worship at 8:00 a.m.; Sunday school at 9:15 a.m.

Good Friday – April 14

 

jesus-christ-crucifixion-395

 

We will gather together on Friday, April 14, at 7 p.m. at MLLC to remember the events of Good Friday.  This is our annual remembrance of the dramatic sacrifice of Jesus for the forgiveness of our sin.

 

Introduction to Good Friday

 

We begin our liturgy as we ended the Maundy Thursday Liturgy: in silence. What was begun then continues this day as we journey with our Savior from the Last Supper, the stripping and humiliation, to the cross and tomb. Good Friday is the second day of the Triduum, the “Three Sacred Days” of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday with its Vigil of Easter.

The Good Friday Liturgy is marked with austerity, silence and reflection. The chancel itself is bare from the Maundy Thursday “Stripping of the Altar”. There is no organ music except to accompany the hymns. Everything focuses on our adoration of the crucified Christ, reigning from the throne of the cross.

 

The service of Tenebrae is an ancient Holy Week devotion which began in the 7th or 8th century, or possibly earlier.  The name “Tenebrae” means shadows.  The service takes its name from the ceremony of extinguishing in succession all the lights in the sanctuary, casting it into total darkness which is symbolic of the disciples’ desertion of our Lord, and of his death and burial.

The purpose of the Tenebrae Service is to aid us in realizing the total impact of the darkest day in the history of the world, the day Jesus died on the cross.

 

The opening portion of the liturgy includes no praise. It proceeds directly to the Invocation and Prayer of the Day. It is a simplified version of our Sunday Liturgy of the Word. The chief acts are the reading of the Passion of St. John and the Bidding Prayer for the needs of our world.

 

Following the final hymn is a meditation on the Seven Last Words of our Lord which he spoke from the cross.  After each word is read, there will be a prayer and silent meditation.  Lights and one candle will be extinguished after each meditation until the sanctuary is in darkness.

 

After the lights are all extinguished, the congregation will stand as the Paschal Candle is carried from the sanctuary reminding us of the burial of Jesus.  A loud noise, made by the closing of a Bible, will remind us of the closing of the tomb.  This announces the fulfilling of the Scriptures and the completion of our Lord’s work on the cross for us.

 

The Paschal Candle (called the Christ Candle during Advent/Christmas) will not return until the beginning of the Great Vigil of Easter on Saturday evening at 7 p.m.  On Good Friday we recognize that Jesus was fully dead and was placed in the borrowed tomb.

 

Note:  The return of the Paschal Candle moments after the loud noise is a form of the Good Friday service designed to be used in those congregations which do not have the Great Vigil of Easter.

All will leave in silence to return tomorrow as we wait in vigil and then celebrate our Lord’s Resurrection at the Great Vigil of Easter.  At the Vigil tomorrow evening we will have the first Holy Communion in celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.

 

Schedule for the rest of Holy Week:

Easter Vigil – Saturday – 7:00 p.m. – in sanctuary – a joint service for both MLLC and Waldeck.

 

Resurrection Sunday:

Resurrection Sunrise service at 6:45 a.m. at the Carmine Cemetery – a joint service for both MLLC and Waldeck

 (Bring your own chairs for seating at the cemetery)

 

Waldeck Festival Service – 8:00 a.m., followed by a Pot-luck Easter Breakfast.  Also and Easter Egg hunt will happen around 9:30 a.m.

 

MLLC Festival Service at 10:00 a.m. in the sanctuary

Egg hunt for the children. ~11:15 a.m.

 

Good Friday is March 25

jesus-christ-crucifixion-395

 

We will gather together on Friday, March 25, at 7 p.m. to remember the events of Good Friday.  This is our annual remembrance of the dramatic sacrifice of Jesus for the forgiveness of our sin.

 

Introduction to Good Friday

We begin our liturgy as we ended the Maundy Thursday Liturgy: in silence. What was begun then continues this day as we journey with our Savior from the Last Supper, the stripping and humiliation, to the cross and tomb. Good Friday is the second day of the Triduum, the “Three Sacred Days” of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday with its Vigil of Easter.

The Good Friday Liturgy is marked with austerity, silence and reflection. The chancel itself is bare from the Maundy Thursday stripping. There is no organ music except to accompany the hymns. Everything focuses on our adoration of the crucified Christ, reigning from the throne of the cross.

The service of Tenebrae is an ancient Holy Week devotion which began in the 7th or 8th century, or possibly earlier.  The name “Tenebrae” means shadows.  The service takes its name from the ceremony of extinguishing in succession all the lights in the sanctuary, casting it into total darkness which is symbolic of the disciples’ desertion of our Lord, and of his death and burial.

The purpose of the Tenebrae Service is to aid us in realizing the total impact of the darkest day in the history of the world, the day Jesus died on the cross.

The opening portion of the liturgy includes no praise. It proceeds directly to the Invocation and Prayer of the Day. It is a simplified version of our Sunday Liturgy of the Word. The chief acts are the reading of the Passion of St. John and the Bidding Prayer for the needs of our world.

Following the final hymn is a meditation on the Seven Last Words of our Lord which he spoke from the cross.  After each word is read, there will be a prayer and silent meditation.  Lights and one candle will be extinguished after each meditation until the sanctuary is in darkness.

After the lights are all extinguished, the congregation will stand as the Paschal Candle is carried from the sanctuary reminding us of the burial of Jesus.  A loud noise, made by the closing of a Bible,will remind us of the closing of the tomb.  This announces the fulfilling of the Scriptures and the completion of our Lord’s work on the cross for us.

The Paschal Candle (called the Christ Candle during Advent/Christmas) will not return until the beginning of the Great Vigil of Easter on Saturday evening at 7 p.m.  On Good Friday we recognize that Jesus was fully dead and was placed in the borrowed tomb.

Note:  The return of the Paschal Candle moments after the loud noise is a form of the Good Friday service designed to be used in those congregations which do not have the Great Vigil of Easter.

All will leave in silence to return tomorrow as we wait in vigil and then celebrate our Lord’s Resurrection at the Great Vigil of Easter.  At the Vigil tomorrow evening we will have the first Holy Communion in celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.

 

Schedule for the rest of Holy Week:

Easter Vigil – Saturday – 7:00 p.m. – in sanctuary

 

Resurrection Sunday:

Resurrection Sunrise service at 7:30 a.m. at the Carmine Cemetery.

   (Bring your own chairs for seating at the cemetery)

Breakfast in the fellowship hall at 8 a.m.

Festival Resurrection Service at 9:00 a.m. in the sanctuary

Egg hunt and party for the children. ~10:15 a.m

Holy Week Schedule 2016

Holy Week Schedule

We invite you to Holy Week 2016

 

Maundy Thursday, March 24

Maundy bread wine
Worship at 7:00 p.m.
Remembering the Last Supper,
Washing of Feet and Hands, First Holy Communion, Presentation of Bibles to First Communion Candidates

 

Good Friday, March 25

Good Friday nails crown thorns

7:00 p.m.
Prayer and Readings, Tenebrae,
Remembering Jesus’ death on the cross.
Reflections by the Apostle John

 

Note the Three Options for attending Worship on Easter:

A grand celebration of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ our Lord!

Saturday at 7:00 p.m.
Sunday at 7:30 a.m.
Sunday at 9:00 a.m.
Details below:

 

The Resurrection of Our Lord: The Vigil of Easter, March 26

Vigil cross symbols

Worship at 7:00 p.m. (will last until about 8:20-8:30 p.m.)
Service of Light, Service of Readings,
Baptisms or Remembrance of Baptism, Initial Holy Communion of Easter
Entry of Easter Flowers into Sanctuary

 

The Resurrection of our Lord:  Resurrection Sunday, March 27

Resurrection Easter cross flowers
Sunrise Service 7:30 a.m. – Carmine Cemetery – bring a lawn or folding chair for seating.  The service will be held at the covered pavilion at the cemetery in the event of rain.

.
Easter Breakfast 8:00 a.m. – in Fellowship Hall

.
Festival Worship 9:00 a.m. – Sanctuary

.

Sunday School Resurrection Celebration and Egg Hunt ~10:15 a.m.

This is Good Friday

Good Friday Bare ChancelThe area near the Altar is bare of decoration.  This a result of the “Stripping of the Altar” on Maundy Thursday.  Candles for Good Friday are added, as well as a simple, wooden cross.

.

An Introduction to Good Friday – Tenebrae

We begin our liturgy as we ended the Maundy Thursday Liturgy: in silence. What was begun then continues this day as we journey with our Savior from the Last Supper, the stripping and humiliation, to the cross and tomb. Good Friday is the second day of the Triduum, the “Three Sacred Days” of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday with its Vigil of Easter.

The Good Friday Liturgy is marked with austerity, silence and reflection. The chancel itself is bare from the Maundy Thursday stripping. There is no organ music except to accompany the hymns. Everything focuses on our adoration of the crucified Christ, reigning from the throne of the cross.
The service of Tenebrae is an ancient Holy Week devotion which began in the 7th or 8th century, or possibly earlier. The name “Tenebrae” means shadows. The service takes its name from the ceremony of extinguishing in succession all the lights in the sanctuary, casting it into total darkness which is symbolic of the disciples’ desertion of our Lord, and of his death and burial.

The purpose of the Tenebrae Service is to aid us in realizing the total impact of the darkest day in the history of the world, the day Jesus died on the cross.
The opening portion of the liturgy includes no praise. It proceeds directly to the Invocation and Prayer of the Day. It is a simplified version of our Sunday Liturgy of the Word. The chief acts are the reading of the Passion of St. John and the Bidding Prayer for the needs of our world.

Following the final hymn is a meditation on the Seven Last Words of our Lord which he spoke from the cross. After each word is read, there will be a prayer and silent meditation. Lights and one candle will be extinguished after each meditation until the sanctuary is in darkness.
After the lights are all extinguished, the congregation will stand as the Paschal Candle is carried from the sanctuary reminding us of the burial of Jesus. A loud noise, made by the closing of a Bible, will remind us of the closing of the tomb. This announces the fulfilling of the Scriptures and the completion of our Lord’s work on the cross for us.
The Paschal Candle (called the Christ Candle during Advent/Christmas) will not return until the beginning of the Great Vigil of Easter on Saturday evening at 7 p.m. On Good Friday we recognize that Jesus was fully dead and was placed in the borrowed tomb.

Note: The return of the Paschal Candle moments after the loud noise is a form of the Good Friday service designed to be used in those congregations which do not have the Great Vigil of Easter.
All will leave in silence to return tomorrow as we wait in vigil and then celebrate our Lord’s resurrection at the Great Vigil of Easter. At the Vigil tomorrow evening we will have the first Holy Communion in celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Schedule for the rest of Holy Week:
Easter Vigil – Saturday – 7:00 p.m. – in sanctuary
Resurrection Sunrise service at 7:30 a.m. at the Carmine Cemetery.
(Bring your own chairs for seating at the cemetery)
Breakfast in the fellowship hall at 8 a.m.
Festival Resurrection Service at 9:00 a.m.
Egg hunt and party for the children. ~10:15 a.m.

Preparing for Maundy Thursday

CommunionBreadWineThursday, April 2 is our Maundy Thursday service.  We invite you to gather with the people of God at MLLC at 7:00 p.m.

We believe it is an important and faith enriching experience to be part of these special days.  Worship will be each night at 7:00 p.m.  These Three Days together are called the Great Triduum.

*Maundy Thursday – April 2 – We connect with the events of the Last Supper of Jesus with his Apostles.  We also remember his betrayal and arrest.

*Good Friday – April 3 – We connect with the suffering, death and entombment of Jesus Christ.

*The Great Vigil of Easter – April 4 – We remember the waiting of the followers of Jesus when he was in the tomb and before he was raised from the dead.  We celebrate the victory of the Resurrection from the dead of Jesus.

Here is the introduction we use for Maundy Thursday:

The Maundy Thursday service is one of endings and beginnings. What was begun on Ash Wednesday is brought to a close here today. What begins today does not end until the Day of Resurrection. It is the ancient Triduum, “The Three Sacred Days,” which lead us to the celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord: Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday.
The theme is love, our Savior’s love for us, expressed in the washing of the disciples’ feet, in giving himself in bread and wine, in dying upon the cross. An invitation to confession is given. The focus is on forgiveness. On Ash Wednesday, we began Lent with a major act of confession and ashes, but we did not receive a strong statement of forgiveness in the absolution. That bold announcement of forgiveness comes now, “In the mercy of almighty God,” and “in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit,” at the service celebrating Christ’s love.
The lessons of love are read. A new command derives from it: “Love one another.” The name “Maundy” comes from the first word of the Latin form of John 13:34: “Mandatum novum do vobis ut diligatis invicem sicut dilexi vos” (“I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another.”). This self-giving love is demonstrated in the washing of feet. The prayers are said. The table is made ready. The time of the Lord’s Supper arrives, and our Lord is revealed in bread and wine as once he “revealed himself to his disciples.” It is a solemn moment, but we cannot linger here. Nor could the Lord, for His betrayal was imminent.
Before we know it, the markings of betrayal are seen before us. The symbol of Christ in our midst, the altar, is stripped bare. Christ is stripped of his power and glory. Good Friday is inescapable. The powers of darkness work upon him.
In silence, we depart without benediction. The Three Sacred Days continue with the Good Friday service on April 3 at 7:00 p.m. We will also gather on Saturday evening, April 4 at 7 p.m. for the Vigil of Easter.

Holy Week is Coming Soon

Holy-Week-Worship-Art

The centerpiece of the church year is the season of Lent and the events of Holy Week.  We invite you to be part of our revisiting of these core events in the life and ministry of Jesus Christ our Lord.

Click over to our Lent & Holy Week Schedule to find out more.  It is all listed on our recently updated main church page:  Here is the Link.

Introduction to Good Friday

jesus-christ-crucifixion-395

As part of our Good Friday service bulletin we include this introduction to the service.

We gather to worship the Crucified Savior tonight at 7 p.m., Friday, April 18, 2014.

 

An Introduction to Good Friday – Tenebrae

We begin our liturgy as we ended the Maundy Thursday Liturgy: in silence. What was begun then continues this day as we journey with our Savior from the Last Supper, the stripping and humiliation, to the cross and tomb. Good Friday is the second day of the Triduum, the “Three Sacred Days” of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday with its Vigil of Easter.

 

The Good Friday Liturgy is marked with austerity, silence and reflection. The chancel itself is bare from the Maundy Thursday stripping. There is no organ music except to accompany the hymns and sung musical pieces. Everything focuses on our adoration of the crucified Christ, reigning from the throne of the cross.

 

The service of Tenebrae is an ancient Holy Week devotion which began in the 7th or 8th century, or possibly earlier. The name “Tenebrae” means shadows. The service takes its name from the ceremony of extinguishing in succession all the lights in the sanctuary, casting it into total darkness which is symbolic of the disciples’ desertion of our Lord, and of his death and burial.

 

The purpose of the Tenebrae Service is to aid us in realizing the total impact of the darkest day in the history of the world, the day Jesus died on the cross.

 

The opening portion of the liturgy includes no praise. It proceeds directly to the Prayer of the Day. It is a simplified version of our Sunday Liturgy of the Word. The chief acts are the reading of the Passion of St. John and the Bidding Prayer for the needs of our world. After each section of the Passion of St. John is read, there will be a time of silent meditation. Lights will begin to be extinguished or dimmed more after each reading and meditation until the sanctuary is in darkness.

 

A large cross, which vividly and dramatically portrays the events of this day, is then brought into the church in solemn procession to become the focus of our adoration of the crucified Christ. Placed upon at the front of the chancel, the crucifix is central to our meditations in word and in silence. The words of meditation are the ancient Reproaches. The words of reproach are those of God directed to us, his people, who have crucified the Savior of the world by our sin. The Reproaches expand upon the words of the prophet Micah (6:3-5) and burn in our hearts. The liturgy does not end on this note of reproach, however. The closing versicles and prayer emphasize the triumph and redemption that comes through the cross.

 

After the lights are all extinguished, the congregation will stand as the Paschal Candle is carried from the sanctuary reminding us of the burial of Jesus. A loud noise, made by the closing of a Bible, will remind us of the closing of the tomb as well as the fulfilling of the Scriptures and the completion of our Lord’s work on the cross for us.

 

The Paschal Candle (called the Christ Candle during Advent/Christmas) will not return until the beginning of the Great Vigil of Easter on Saturday evening at 7 p.m. On Good Friday we recognize that Jesus was fully dead and was placed in the borrowed tomb.

 

Note: The return of the Paschal Candle moments after the loud noise is a form of the Good Friday service designed to be used in those congregations which do not have the Great Vigil of Easter.

 

All will leave in silence to return tomorrow as we wait in vigil and then celebrate our Lord’s resurrection at the Great Vigil of Easter. At the Vigil tomorrow evening we will have the first Holy Communion in celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.

After the Triduum we will continue our celebration on Sunday morning with the Sunrise service at 7:30 at the Carmine Cemetery, breakfast in the fellowship hall at 8 a.m. and the Festival Service at 9:00 a.m. Around 10:15-10:30 a.m. we will have the Resurrection Egg hunt and party for the children.

Click here to see the first post in this series about Maundy Thursday.

 

Thanks to Pr. Thomas L. Weitzel, ELCA.  This introduction was adapted from his original work.

Holy Week Message from our Presiding Bishop

Image

Photo from the Flossenburg Chapel, as noted in the Good Friday Message.  This photo is from this blog site:  click

 

We are in the midst of Holy Week 2014.  We have moved from the joyful entry of Jesus into Jerusalem, and we remember that he is headed to the cross.  As we follow in the way of Jesus we reflect on the truth of the cross.  Here is a powerful message from our ELCA Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton.

Click this link for the Good Friday Message

Image

Presiding Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) – the Rev. Elizabeth Eaton

This was first published in “The Lutheran” magazine, and comes to us through our Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast Synod web site blog.