Devotion and Readings for February 1, 2, and 3, 2021

Presentation of our Lord

Bible Readings and Devotion for February 1, 2 and 3, 2021

Here are the references for the readings.  Please look these up in your print Bible, your smartphone app Bible, or your online Bible.

February 1

Matthew 10:1-15

Hebrews 12:12-29

Psalm 78:41-72 and 80

Genesis 32

February 2

*Luke 2:22-40

Malachi 3:1-7

Psalms 24, 81, 84

Genesis 33

February 3

Matthew 10:16-26  

Malachi 3:8-15

Psalms 83, 85

Genesis 34

Devotion for February 1, 2, 3, 2021

By Pastor David Tinker

This article was originally published on the mllccarmine.com web site in 2014.  It has been adapted for the current context.

presentation-of-our-lord Icon

This date, February 2, is a very special celebration among Christians.  We celebrate what is called the feast of the Presentation of our Lord.  On February 2 each year the church celebrates the presentation of Jesus in the Temple at Jerusalem. Ancient Jewish law required that, following the birth of a firstborn male child, the mother must come to the temple after 40 days for purification and for presentation of the child to the Lord.  February 2 is the 40th day of Christmas.  Christmas Day being day 1; February 2nd being day 40.

The presentation of Mary’s child, however, was different from most. This was the Christ Child, Jesus, the Savior, the Messiah who had been promised. And he was recognized as such by the old prophet Simeon, who knew that this child was “a light for revelation to all nations.” Thus, the image of light carries an important part in this day’s liturgy and links itself with the Christmas season and its lights of the Advent wreath, the decorative tree lights, and the many candles of the Nativity celebration.

To mark this particular feast, the ancient tradition calls for 1) the blessing of candles and burning oils to be used during the year and 2) a procession “to meet the Lord,” just as Simeon and Anna went to the Temple and found the Christ there. The liturgy is called “Candlemas” (the Candle Mass).

Here is another special note about this day.  In the reading from Luke we have the Canticle of Simeon, often called the “Nunc Dimittis”.  This is Latin phrase which begins this Canticle of Simeon.  Many churches use this Canticle of Simeon during funerals.  Since my arrival as pastor at Martin Luther Lutheran Church in Carmine we have been using this statement as well.  Here is what we use in the funerals:

“Lord, now you let your servant go in peace:

your Word has been fulfilled.

My own eyes have seen the salvation

which you have prepared in the sight of every people:

a light to reveal you to the nations

and the glory of your people Israel.   (Luke 2:29-32)

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,

As it was in the beginning, is now and will be forever.”

This Canticle of Simeon is used because of the context of its original use in Luke chapter 2.  Simeon was promised by God that he would not die until he had met the Lord’s Messiah.  He was likely a bit older, possibly around the age of Anna (noted in Luke 2:36-38). She was 84 years old.  Upon meeting the Messiah, Jesus, Simeon could rest in peace.  When a Christian, who is a person who has met the Messiah, has died, we remember his or her relationship with God and the fulfillment of God’s promises when we share this Canticle of Simeon.

Original Text by Pr. Thomas L. Weitzel, adapted and added to for use at MLLC and mllccarmine.com by Pr. David J. Tinker

Almighty and ever-living God, your only-begotten Son was presented this day in the temple. May we be presented to you with clean and pure hearts by the same Jesus Christ, our great high priest, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen

Prayer from Evangelical Lutheran Worship. Copyright © 2021 Augsburg Fortress. All rights reserved.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s